granovit2529d5

itibaren Chak Balaram, West Bengal 721126, Hindistan itibaren Chak Balaram, West Bengal 721126, Hindistan

Okuyucu itibaren Chak Balaram, West Bengal 721126, Hindistan

itibaren Chak Balaram, West Bengal 721126, Hindistan

granovit2529d5

I always think it is much harder for an author to keep a reader's interest when the subsequent books in the series contain the same protagonists. That which filled me with awe upon my first read is now familiar, and less likely to thrill to the same degree. Having said that, I think Nalini Singh has done a wonderful job in this PNR to flesh out the world she has created in the first book of the 'Guild Hunter' series. It is unlike any of the other fantasies I have read. While the main couple, Elena and Raphael, are reminiscent of Cat and Bones in Jeaniene Frost's 'Night Huntress' novels or Eve and Roarke in J.D. Robb's 'In Death' series, the world in which the story takes place almost becomes a character itself, rich with it's own politics and rules. Angels who are corrupted by power, Archangels playing at gods with the dead and of course, romance to boot. A great read! I look forward to the next in the series.

granovit2529d5

EPL book discussion

granovit2529d5

While I read this book quickly, I really struggled with enjoying it. The characterization wasn't nearly as well-executed as The Kite Runner. All the characters were very stereotypical and one-dimensional to the point of being unsympathetic, even the stereotypically sympathetic ones. The plot, however, was very compelling. The story was told against the backdrop of a swath of Afghan history, and Hosseini did a good job of using his story to reflect the general feelings of different factions at each part of the timeline. The history of Afghanistan is, obviously, full of turmoil. The 30 year timeframe Hosseini studied here is just a very small, recent snippet of a long, long history of turmoil. Through his story, however, he tells this piece of history well. It is interesting and sad to see how the Afghanis kept (and keep) seeing the next up-coming faction as their savior only to once again have a government that is not truly concerned about the well-being of the people. The book also makes a very poignant statement on the fact that all wars take the lives of someone's loved ones, even a war concerned about the ultimate well-being of the people.