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I have been "currently reading" this book since 2001.

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Rated 1 star for false advertising, unsatisfactory answers given. Here we have another spin-off for Strobel the self-proclaimed "former atheist," "skeptic," and "journalist." In brief, Strobel goes on a quest to find answers for "the toughest questions that stand between people and faith in Christianity." What's funny is that Strobel thinks (or pretends to think) that he can actually "get to the bottom of this Christianity thing once and for all," and that he can accomplish this monumental task after a mere two years of research(!) - and by research, Stobel means interviewing a small number of Christian apologists who all share the same opinions. The idea that this breezy, half-assed book is somehow going to put any serious doubts about the Christian faith to rest is absurd to begin with. It's also a mystery as to why Strobel thinks he can continue posing as a no-nonsense, hard-nosed investigator. He spends most of his interviews accepting everything he is told only occasionally raising a token objection here and there for show. Even somebody who knows next to nothing about how to carry on an investigation outside of crime novels or detective movies could tell you that an investigator never gets anywhere by just taking one side of the story at face value the way Strobel does. The preface to TCFF is the most telling part of the book. It serves as a parable summing up the thrust of Strobel's entire argument, a story about two men, Billy Graham and Charles Templeton, the preacher and the preacher-turned-skeptic. In this prefatory parable, we are told that Templeton (former evangelical crusader and colleague of Graham) lost his faith because he began to ask serious questions about his evangelical Christian beliefs. In Strobel's own words, instead of "letting his heart soar to God, Templeton's intellect kept him securely tied down." In contrast to Templeton, Billy Graham, when confronted with troubling questions, prayed to God and decided to simply believe in things he couldn't understand instead of grappling with these difficult questions head on. Because he chose the way of simpleminded faith, we are told that Graham was rewarded with feelings of strength and empowerment and later further rewarded with great success in his ministry career. (Prosperity and success always carry more weight with these people than any kind of intellectual integrity. They're salesmen, not sages. ) Is it a little odd that a book claiming to ask and answer difficult religious questions would begin by demonizing critical thinking and intellectual honesty? Is it strange that before the reader even reaches the first chapter of a book claiming to take an honest look at "the toughest questions facing Christian beliefs", a person who dares question conventional, evangelical/fundamentalist dogma is portrayed as standing on a precipice of doom all but surely condemned to a future of misery, failure, ruin and despair? This might seem quite strange at first, that is until you realize this book never intends to ask any questions in the spirit of legitimate inquiry. TCFF is nothing more than another way of remarketing the same old type of fundamentalist Christian theology where "making a decision for Christ" far outweights any thinking for oneself. Look for the further adventures of Strobel in his upcoming book: The Case for More Ca$h: How an Aging, Mediocre Journali$t Found Jesus... Could Be So Financially Profitable!