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Benjamin Nash Nash itibaren Shaw, MS 38773, Birleşik Devletler itibaren Shaw, MS 38773, Birleşik Devletler

Okuyucu Benjamin Nash Nash itibaren Shaw, MS 38773, Birleşik Devletler

Benjamin Nash Nash itibaren Shaw, MS 38773, Birleşik Devletler

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Biraz kışkırtıcı, ama ilginç. Bu kitabın "şok değeri" ciddi şekilde abartılıyor. Son bölüm (veya kesin olarak, son paragrafı), önceki tüm bölümleri entrika ve şüphe hacminden fazladır.

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Translating...

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Çok iyi yazılmış ve bu kitabın hikayeyi anlatmak için aldığı yaklaşımı sevdim (doğrusal olmayan hikaye anlatımı, farklı sözlük kelimelerinin anlattığı bir hikaye ve ilişkilerdeki ince nüansları ve iniş çıkışlarını araştıran bir hikaye).

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This was a feel good novel. Two people who just happened to re-cross eachothers path, end up in a very important close friendship.

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Blood and Guts opens with ten-year-old Janey Smith barricading her front door because she suspects her father (“boyfriend, brother, sister, money, amusement and father”) of sleeping with another woman. Once this nasty little incest narrative is established, we are flung into a mish-mash of words, languages, genres and styles which leaves the reader totally confounded and with no idea what is supposed to be going on. A thin plotline can be extricated from this mess: Janey leaves her home in Mexico and moves to New York City, she joins a gang, works in a “cooky” shop, is kidnapped and sold to a Persian slave trader who teaches her to become a prostitute, and finally runs away to Tangier to live in an abusive relationship with Jean Genet. Besides this, we get lots of rude drawings, snippets of poems, some massive plagiarism of The Scarlet Letter, a bit of Persian text, some intricate mind maps, and so on. Needless to say, on first reading this book I just sat there shaking my head. It is totally nonsensical and at some points, I thought, ridiculous (e.g. Janey’s prison poetry: “Shit smears on my hands I stink I googoo I stink real good I stink when I smear shit across my face.”) By now I have done enough background reading to understand (sort of) what Acker was trying to do. The redundancy of words in expressing Janey’s feelings is meant to reflect the fact that all forms of communication (including language) are patriarchal and thus insufficient...I think. And apparently it is meant to be so crazy and impenetrable so that it can’t be recycled into popular culture (the fate of literature in postmodern society). All well and good, but the fact remains that the book isn’t accessible by the average reader. Even if this is the whole point, it prevents it from being enjoyable. I can appreciate this book without being able to say I “liked” it. Still, it was about a million times better than Burroughs. I found myself sympathising with and even liking Janey (despite everything), laughing at the thrashing dealt to Erica Jong and learning a bit of Persian. Plus, who doesn’t love a good picture book (even if it’s not exactly read-on-public-transport material)? A well earned two stars.

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I Love these books! The characters are interesting and complex. The story as always twists and turns, leaving the reader wondering where it will go next. Just enough mystery, suspense and sci-fi for me! Can't wait for the next book to come out. Why'd I wait so long to read this one?!